25. Februar 1990
BAKER, GENSCHER DISCUSS FULL RANGE OF ISSUES (Talks include CSCE, German unification) (1,310)
Washington -- Following is the transcript of remarks made by Secretary of State James A. Baker III and West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher following their February 2 meeting as released by the State Department February 5. Mr. Genscher spoke in German and his remarks were interpreted by a translator.
(Begin transcript)

Quelle: Public Diplomacy Query TL127385


File Date/ID: 02/05/90 Text Link:127385
BAKER, GENSCHER DISCUSS FULL RANGE OF ISSUES (Talks include CSCE, German unification) (1,310)
Washington -- Following is the transcript of remarks made by Secretary of State James A. Baker III and West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher following their February 2 meeting as released by the State Department February 5. Mr. Genscher spoke in German and his remarks were interpreted by a translator.
(Begin transcript)
BAKER: Ladies and gentlemen, let me simply say that the Minister and I have had an opportunity to cover a very full range of bilateral and multilateral issues. We talked about the circumstances involved in the CSCE summit meeting in the year 1990. We talked a bit about the European Development Bank. Of course, we talked about the question of German unification. We talked about the United States' ties with the European Community.
GENSCHER: I certainly welcome this opportunity which we had to exchange our views, in particular the forthcoming visit of the Secretary to the Soviet Union. Last Tuesday I had talks in Paris. This coming Tuesday the British Foreign Minister is going to be in Bonn. As you are aware, we are all greatly interested in seeing a CSCE summit take place this year so that we can, at that event, discuss together the future of Europe, so that at that event we can sign the agreements we are negotiating in Vienna at present, so that we can underpin the principles contained in that process once again and the Final Act of Helsinki. And this in particular for us the right to free elections in all countries. Such a summit conference is important also, because it opens up perspectives for the future of Europe -- for German unity.
After the 18th of March -- the day on which there will be free elections in the GDR -- we are going to enter into negotiations with that freely elected government about the future of the two German states. We are convinced that the freely elected government of the GDR will, just as ourselves, want to see the process of unity be imbedded in the process of European unity.
BAKER: Before we take your questions, let me simply add that I am very grateful that the Minister was able to come all the way over here for this meeting. He has flown over, and he is now flying right back to Germany. I had the opportunity to meet with the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs of the United Kingdom on Monday, and I will be seeing the French Foreign Minister in Shannon when we stop to refuel on our way to Moscow early Tuesday morning. We obviously discussed, as well, matters expected to come up during the course of my Ministerial Meeting with Mr. Shevardnadze in Moscow.
QUESTION: Can you be specific about your talks on reunification and how that would effect your discussions in Moscow?
BAKER: Well, I think the Minister was pretty specific in what he said there. This a matter we agree and others agree needs to be addressed. We agree that we need to develop a process and a framework for doing that, taking into consideration the interests of all who are involved in the issue.
Q: Mr. Secretary, in your Berlin speech you talked about your connection of Germany to NATO. There's a lot of discussion in my country about what do you mean by that?
BAKER: Well, I think what I said was "continued membership" in NATO, or words generally to that effect. We, as you know, in the United States spoke out very early in favor of the unification of Germany. We made the point that this is something that the United States has supported for forty years -- a policy approach that we have supported for forty years -- and we continue to support it. But we laid out four principles or guidelines that we thought and felt should guide the process. I think that I am frankly encouraged by what the Minister himself said not long ago in Germany about the importance of continued membership in the NATO Alliance.
GENSCHER: Perhaps I might add, we were in full agreement that there is no intention to extend the NATO area of defense and the security toward the East. This holds true not only for GDR, which we have no intention of simply incorporating, but that holds true for all the other Eastern countries. We are at present witnessing dramatic developments in the whole of the Eastern area, in COCOM, and the Warsaw Pact. I think that it is part (of) that partnership in stability which we can offer to the East that we can make it quite clear that whatever happens within the Warsaw Pact, on our side there is no intention to extend our area -- NATO's area -- of defense towards the East. On the contrary, that is, as a matter of fact, why the CSCE process is so important to us, because it offers an additional network of security and that is body, an area, within which things can be developed jointly. That is why we, together the United States and Germany, are all in favor of the on-going process of the forthcoming CSCE summit to take place this year.
Q: (In German)
GENSCHER: Foreign Minister Baker in his Berlin Speech said that those alliances need to take on a more and more political role, and this indeed is necessary if they are to be able to confront the challenges of the future. We therefore must contribute to establishing cooperative relations with the East. We must develop cooperative structures within which it will be easier to bring about solutions, easier than some people may be thinking at present.
Q: (In German).
GENSCHER: The question was -- or the remark made by the gentleman -- "This idea apparently has not fully been thought out, and I'm referring also to the speech your Minister recently made at the Academy in Tootsing (?). There is the problem of the two blocs, and the Warsaw Pact apparently at present is in full dissolution. So how do you think this should work? How can the Federal Republic be kept within NATO? How can the GDR be expected to half-
way enter into NATO."
The Minister's answer was this: Nobody ever spoke about a half-way membership, this way or that. What I said is, there is no intention of extending the NATO area to the East. And I think you should wait for things to further develop, and you will see that from confrontation we will move to cooperation.
We can assume that that will be the situation at this summit, the CSCE summit, which will take place in the fall. This will bring about a dramatic change in climate. Two things, at any rate, will be substantially different then as compared to the first CSCE summit in 1975. First of all, there will not be confrontation but the world will be moving towards cooperation. Second, the two German states, as they come to that summit, will not come with diverging views but, as I hope, with a joint concept.
BAKER: Let me just say one final word, and then the Minister -- really we should let him go because I think it's two o'clock in the morning or maybe even later than that.
With respect to the question of the CSCE summit this year, we are in agreement that any such summit should sign a CFE agreement. We must conclude this conventional forces agreement, get it finished so that it can be signed at the summit and the summit really should be dependent upon our coinciding that.
We are also in agreement that any such summit should involve the inclusion of a right of free elections as an additional human right in the human rights basket of the CSCE, and this summit should work to adequately prepare the ground for the 1992 summit that has been scheduled for quite some time.
Thank you.
(end transcript) NNNN
File Date/ID: 02/05/90 Text Link:127385


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